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Rebordering Britain & Britons after Brexit

Brexit & free movement of workers

Abstract

The essay examines the different workers' movement regimes envisaged after the United Kingdom leaves the EU, highlighting the difficulties and contradictions of UK choice. In the first part, the authors look at the position of EU nationals currently living and working in the UK, while in the second part they consider the UK plans for its new immigration policy which is due to come into force on 1 January 2021. Finally, the authors briefly examine what the UK is asking for in terms of the UK-EU Free Trade Agreement.

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Journal

Lavoro e Diritto

Authors

Catherine Barnard (United Kingdom)
Emilija Leinarte (United Kingdom)

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