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Rebordering Britain & Britons after Brexit

Free movement of services, migration and leaving the EU

Abstract

For many people the key question in the referendum is whether a vote to leave will enable the UK to take back control of its borders. So for them the focus is primarily on Article 45 on the Treaty of the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) which allows free movement of workers. But for individuals much movement to other EU Member States is covered by Article 56 TFEU on the free movement of services. This article will argue that empirical research shows that there is in fact an interesting link between temporary migration under Article 56 TFEU and ultimately permanent migration under Article 45 TFEU. Brexit has the potential profoundly to affect both.

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Journal

National Institute Economic Review

Authors

Catherine Barnard (United Kingdom)
Amy Ludlow (United Kingdom)

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