Skip to main content
Rebordering Britain & Britons after Brexit

Analysing migrants' ageing in place as embodied practices of embedding through time: 'Kilburn is not Kilburn any more'

Abstract

There is growing attention to how people navigate and make sense of particular places through the ageing process. Against this backdrop, there is increasing research on ageing in contexts of migration. Although much of this research focuses on retirement and return migration, comparatively less is known about migrants who remain in the destination society, especially in advanced old age. Drawing on qualitative data, we analyse the experiences of three groups of ageing migrants who have been less visible in research and policy (Caribbean, Irish, and Polish) and of those living in two U.K. sites (London and Yorkshire). Using the concept of embedding, we analyse migrants' identifications with and attachment to particular places over time. In so doing, we highlight not only how migrants negotiate dynamic local places through embodied ageing processes but also how these negotiations may be mediated by wider sociopolitical events including Brexit and the `Windrush scandal'.

You might also be interested in :

Migrant Capitals: Proposing a Multi-Level Spatio-Temporal Analytical Framework
This article explores how migrants utilize and access different forms of capital. Using a Bourdieusian approach to capital, we focus on how migrants' temporal and spatial journeys are shaped by and in turn shape their opportunities to mobilize resources and convert them into capitals.
Talking about Bordering
In the summer of 2019 as the UK was in the midst of heated Brexit debates and Theresa May's minority government clung on to power, Professor Louise Ryan interviewed Professor Nira Yuval-Davis about her recent book Bordering (Yuval-Davis, Wemyss and Cassidy 2019).
Bringing anchoring and embedding together: theorising migrants' lives over-time
In this paper, we bring together two concepts that we have been developing separately over recent years, to challenge linear and simplistic notions of migrant integration, depict multi-dimensional processes of settling and changeability over time.
Belonging in Brexit Britain: Central and Eastern European 1.5 generation young people's experiences
In this paper, we examine the experiences of young people born in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) who are part of the 1.5 migrant generation living in “Brexit Britain.” We focus on two key themes: (a) young people's feelings of belonging to Britain, their countries of birth and Europe…

Journal

Population Space and Place

Authors

Louise Ryan (United Kingdom)
Majella Kilkey (United Kingdom)
Magdolna Lorinc (United Kingdom)
Obert Tawodzera (United Kingdom)

Article meta

Country / region covered

Populations studied

Year of Publication

Source type

Keywords